Musica . concert venues were invented

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Strasbourg. music festival
TJP, Great Hall. 17-IX-2022: Zad Malikah (born 1967): Armoise for clarinets and video; Moisare, for soprano and video. Daphne Hegbri (born in 1994): +1, soprano, bass clarinet and electronics; Georges Abergés (born 1945): half lyrics, voice and clarinet; Zeynep Gedizlioglu (born 1977): NN 3: 4 / Speak!, for soprano, clarinet and string quartet. Akroche Ensemble Note: Françoise Kubler, soprano; Armand Angster, Clarinet. Adastra Quartet
18-IX-2022: Thierry Blondeau (born 1961): Jumble for comble; Noriko Baba (born 1972): Bonburi, for small band; Shiosai, the noise of the waves, for piano, violin and cello; musical bestarium, for the band; Gerard Gracie (1946-1998): Talia. Ensemble Kern, Direction: Guillaume Bourgogne

Check out the places where music is listened to. Make music heard in the places that inspired it. These are all projects that revitalize the spirit of Musica and its director Stefan Roth, and invite listeners to new listening experiences.

The concept is new to Musica and has met with some success. The Concerts for the Self, titled Secret Music, concerns fifteen unusual venues, private or deserted, in downtown Strasbourg where an artist and a listener meet face to face. The appointment is set in advance, according to the available time slots, but the venue address is only disclosed by SMS 48 hours in advance.

We cross the threshold at the appointed time, given by the receptionist Musica. The concert lasts twenty minutes, and the content of the performance is decided only after the event, during the other twenty minutes of conversations with the interpreter who presents us with his room programme. This is the “concert for self” protocol. We must live the experience personally, in this intimacy with sound and space where it resonates: so many feelings and emotions in the moment of music, that everyone, or not, can testify after the fact.

Fantasy Musica

after, after data port, in the Strasbourg region of Port-de-Rhin in 2021, Ensembles 2.2 continues its literary and musical writing project in the territory. Designed by Sebastian Desener, Unirupolis It is a science fiction story whose chapters are geographically located in Sheltigheim, near Strasbourg. “Dreams are the backbone of this story,” the writer specifies. The music and sound recording were produced by Gaëtan Gromer and Antoine Spindler, with the participation of students from Leclerc College in Sheltigheim. It is up to the listener (Onironaute), the headphones, to invent their journey through the streets of Sheltigheim and live the story according to their chosen path: an immersive wander that opens new spaces and modifies perception. intersecting places.

At the TJP stage, with Accroche Note and Cairn

Two concerts are performed in the morning on the TJP Theatre, Center Dramatique National de Strasbourg.

The first gives carte blanche to the legendary duo Françoise Kobler/Armand Anguester (singer and clarinetist respectively), founders of the variable geometry group Accroche in 1981, noting that Musica has been programmed every year since the festival’s inception. “We wanted to hang the tones together and help the so-called contemporary music to be less fearful of the audience,” sums up the clarinetist.

Learn more about my hero today with fire herb And the Moisari, Very funny mirror pieces composed by Zad Maltka and featuring our musicians. in fire herb (2011) for video and clarinet, Françoise is filmed, answering an imaginary interlocutor whose questions (or not) are guessing (or not) when Armand (whom the topic is about) is on stage and constantly plays on the spoken voice of his companion. Moisari (2022) reverses the scenario. Armand Inguester, the photographer, talks to us about his partner while the singer is in live adornment, by striking comedic situations: the musical theater that borders the world of Georges Abergés, also on the concert poster. half words (2022) is a fusion duet between voice and clarinet, tender, sensual and full of subtlety in the interpretation of the musicians and fellow travelers to whom it is directed.

“I have always been drawn to electronics in dialogue with sound, like its extension, in echo,” says Françoise Kobler, who then, with her partner, translates the mixed piece for Daphne Hegbri, a young composer who studied composition in Strasbourg. +1 For sound (without text), bass clarinets and electronics create a space of tension where opposing energies intersect and collide, in a register of slightly repetitive gestures that struggle to generate authentic play.

With the equally mysterious title, NN 3: 4 / Speak! Written by Zeynep Gedizlioglu (I also studied composition in Strasbourg, with Yvan Fidel) combines soprano, clarinet and string quartet (Strasbourg adastra battalion). In this music of gestures, so full of liveliness, where the composer maintains the discontinuity and a certain roughness of the material, the text comes only at the end, passes through the half-spoken, half-singing voice, and leaves an unexpected theatrical dimension.

The next day (same room, same time), Cairn’s band honors Paris-based Japanese composer, Noriko Baba, with a showcase of three of their works, including a world premiere: a chance to better understand this musician’s unique universe. The mystery of things, shadows and dreams compete with the imagination and colors of childhood. There is a toy piano within reach of Caroline Crane and red matryoshka thrones along with many other accessories on the percussionist’s table.

Bonburi (2008), which today translates as “paper lantern,” takes on another meaning if we go back to the etymology, as the author tells us; It refers to a hazy state with blurred features, one that Noriko Baba wants to suggest through the game of appearances/disappearance of sounds, “like candlelit decor items in a dark room,” as she identifies: ephemeral and crisp music, touches and filtered sounds, breath and silence. It is a reflection of the things the composer wants to capture, the beauty of shadows more than the things themselves. The piano was prepared in ShiozaiAnd the roar of the waves (2012), for piano, violin, and cello, allowing a faint, low, manic voice to be heard throughout the duration of the piece. It’s written in remembrance of the 2011 tsunami, with the idea of ​​evoking the wave and the shriek of seagulls doubling down, drowned out by more irritating noises (sounds of works, helicopter movement): middle, poetic as much as tragic, as the composer’s voices slip.

Fond of a healthy world in which the elements of nature, birds, and the cries of animals participate, Noriko Baba sets out to create an animal inspired (in progress) in the form of an alphabet. The sonic imagination works for every genre, as Noriko Baba equips the performers with his array of familiar accessories, calls, harmonic pipes, harmonica, sliding flute, music box (matryoshka) and other particular whistling in the air for the first four numbers given at the world premiere. melodic oscillation (piano playing) and other oscillations/endearing of the serpent Aspis; glissandi and flexatone hesitated references to the Bernacle’s risking goose (beginning of the funeral procession) to fall off; Cuculus (Coucou) develops into a clearer and more cheerful record before the arrival of Draco who reigns in terror and opens the field of resonance (thunder plate, harmonic tubes, kazoo, etc.). Humor competes with the flexibility of the material in this work directed by Guillaume Bourgogne at the helm of a team that is as interactive as it is creative.

The program completes two older works. in Billy Mill (1998) by Thierry Blondeau, a six-instrument unconductive piece, three guitars oscillating “like slow pendulums,” in the words of Cairn Artistic Director Jerome Compier, simulating a great resonance fueled by the sounds of other instrumentalists. With Blondeau, voice is paired with gesture; Each sequence of action invents a new gesture and another stage of sounds. The writing becomes scarce as a melancholy skin, the work ends with the imitation of the instrumentalists, with the gesture but without the sound.

From student to mastery, the concert ends with next (1987) by Gerard Gracie, an emblematic piece of spectral aesthetics in which the composer claims to exploit his two new dimensions, speed and contrast. The unflattering acoustics of TJP make it difficult for the woods to merge and the resonance spread (which comes from the piano) on which the instrumental synthesis of the second part takes place. The violin soloist Constance Ronzatti in the final pages seems even more dizzying, sweeping your instrument record with dazzling brilliance.

Image source © Kyoko Nagashima (Noriko Baba) / Festival Musica

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More details

Strasbourg. music festival
TJP, Great Hall. 17-IX-2022: Zad Malikah (born 1967): Armoise for clarinets and video; Moisare, for soprano and video. Daphne Hegbri (born in 1994): +1, soprano, bass clarinet and electronics; Georges Abergés (born 1945): half lyrics, voice and clarinet; Zeynep Gedizlioglu (born 1977): NN 3: 4 / Speak!, for soprano, clarinet and string quartet. Akroche Ensemble Note: Françoise Kubler, soprano; Armand Angster, Clarinet. Adastra Quartet
18-IX-2022: Thierry Blondeau (born 1961): Jumble for comble; Noriko Baba (born 1972): Bonburi, for small band; Shiosai, the noise of the waves, for piano, violin and cello; musical bestarium, for the band; Gerard Gracie (1946-1998): Talia. Ensemble Kern, Direction: Guillaume Bourgogne

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